The term “Churchillian” describes a writer or speaker whose style emulates that of Former Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill.  Politicians are called Churchillian when they appear to be uncompromising, focused, and strong.  Not often does one come across a Churchillian figure.  Rarer still when one comes upon a Churchillian response to a crisis.

In my May 7, 2021 Blog Post (“The Pandemic’s End Ends Not the Pain”), I outlined my thoughts about the next COVID-19 challenge – dealing with the economic consequences of four (4) million years of “lost life” and the ongoing economic impact to COVID-19 Long Haulers (those suffering Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome or “PACS”).  I candidly expressed my concern that these twin impacts disproportionately hit underserved and disadvantaged communities, and these impacts could last a generation or more.  And I boldly suggested that it did not have to be this way – That examples from our past could give a roadmap to lessen these twin injuries and help us move forward.


Continue Reading Time for Churchillian Action

EEOC published more guidance saying employers can mandate COVID-19 vaccinations.  The “fine print” behind the attention-grabbing headlines finds serious questions unanswered.

Continues exploring mandatory COVID-19 vaccines for workers.

The EEOC updated its COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the cusp of the Memorial Day Holiday Weekend, the unofficial “kick-off” to summer.  The Biden Administration and State Governments make no secret of their desire to get all Americans vaccinated so we can get back to “normal” (whatever that means).

Taking the broad view, contrasting approaches to vaccination incentives resemble a high school science experiment:  officials are trying different approaches to see what works best.  Krispy Kreme offers free donuts; Ohio offers a million-dollar lottery; Indiana offers free Girl Scout Cookies at selected sites; Miami offers a “shot” for a “shot” (free liquor to those 21 or older).

Some believe (that would be me) the CDC announced its sudden “no mask needed if vaccinated” guidance on May 13 to spur folks to get vaccinated.
Continue Reading Broccoli Must be Good for You:  The Government Says So

Examines

The Next Challenge:  COVID-19’s Recovery

We rightly celebrate the deployment of COVID-19 vaccines and the lifting of “stay-at-home” orders.  No one yet says the Pandemic is over.  Many see that the end is in sight, that there is “light” at the “end of the tunnel.”

If we are not careful, not thoughtful about the challenges on our joint recovery road, the light might be a train.

We will take a while to process the scale of COVID-19’s toll.  That toll does not measure easily.  More than 580,000 American lives lost.  Over 33 million Americans ill.  These numbers only begin the tally.  By one estimate, in 2020 alone, U.S. women and men lost over 4 million “years of life” – a measure used by insurance companies and actuaries to gauge the number of years shaved off “normal” life by disease and death.  Focus on that for a minute.  COVID-19 cut short four million years of productive life – Life people would have “used” earning livings, learning, enjoying other’s company, and engaging in those things which make life worth living.

The loss of four million years of useful life does not fit in my brain.  Can we put another number on it?  The median American makes $38,000 per year.  Do the math.  Four million times $38,000 equals what?  My calculator reads:  1.52e11?  That is One-Hundred, Fifty-Two billion dollars — $152,000,000,000.

Every dollar lost means less spent on college, retirement, entertainment, food, clothing, shelter, movies, music and so
Continue Reading The Pandemic’s End Ends Not the Pain.